Wednesday, October 17, 2012

Ancient History, Week 4

First Civilization

History Odyssey Lesson 3 focuses on Mesopotamia, the first civilization of Sumer, cuneiform writing and ancient temples called ziggurats. Since the number of activities for Part 1 and Part 2 seemed a bit lopsided, I decided to divide the workload a little more evenly. What isn't listed below, we will complete next week. I also felt like the recommended ziggurat project was a bit much for us, so we went with a much quicker and simpler one.


Monday

Tuesday
  • Looked up and defined HO dictionary word for Lesson 3, Main Lesson Part 1, word number two.
  • Completed "Ancient Mesopotamia" history pocket (student booklet, words to know, and ziggurat pop-up book).
  • Read A True Book: Mesopotamia by Sunita Apte.

The pop-up ziggurat book was Tessa's favorite part of the "Ancient Mesopotamia" history pocket. This activity required precision folding, cutting and gluing, all of which were challenging for her.
The pop-up ziggurat book was Tessa's favorite part of the "Ancient Mesopotamia" history pocket. This activity required precision folding, cutting and gluing, all of which were challenging for her.

Tessa's completed pop-up ziggurat book! How cool is that?!
Tessa's completed pop-up ziggurat book! How cool is that?!

Wednesday

Other Books of Interest

* HO = 
History Odyssey


Quick and Sweet Ziggurat

History Odyssey lists "Model Ziggurat" from Ancient Egyptians and Their Neighbors: An Activity Guide by Marian Broida as this week's recommended project. While I think it's a worthy project, it requires way too much prep work, skill and drying time for Tessa's age set. Maybe we'll try it during our second cycle of ancients when Tessa is a middle schooler. Instead, we completed "Quick and Sweet Ziggurat", which is listed as an alternative project at the end of "Model Ziggurat". Most supplies for "Quick and Sweet Ziggurat" can easily be found around the house. We only had to buy a $1.50 box of sugar cubes from Wal-Mart.

Tessa began her "Quick and Sweet Ziggurat" by arranging the bottom layer of sugar cubes on a disposable plate, drawing about its perimeter, removing the cubes, then painting with glue within the marked area. We later discovered that it is more efficient to simply dip the sugar cubes into a puddle of glue.
Tessa began her "Quick and Sweet Ziggurat" by arranging the bottom layer of sugar cubes on a disposable plate, drawing about its perimeter, removing the cubes, then painting with glue within the marked area. We later discovered that it is more efficient to simply dip the sugar cubes into a puddle of glue.

Tessa created a rectangle with rows of six cubes, four cubes deep. She stacked the rest of the cubes pyramid style to the top.
Tessa created a rectangle with rows of six cubes, four cubes deep. She stacked the rest of the cubes pyramid style to the top. 

Sugar cubes cut into halves made perfect stairs.
Sugar cubes cut into halves made perfect stairs.

Although we were not directed to do so in the instructions, we applied a layer of glue all over our assembled ziggurat and then sprinkled it with sand to add a bit of color and realism. Afterward, we carried it outside and blew off the extra sand with a hair dryer set to its coolest setting.
Although we were not directed to do so in the instructions, we applied a layer of glue all over our assembled ziggurat and then sprinkled it with sand to add a bit of color and realism. Afterward, we carried it outside and blew off the extra sand with a hair dryer set to its coolest setting.

Tessa's sugar cube ziggurat. Quick and sweet for sure!
Tessa's sugar cube ziggurat. Quick and sweet for sure!

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